Pick Two

More than a few years back, Lowell Williams became a partner at Pentagram and came back to his old stomping grounds in Houston to give a presentation about his experiences to the local AIGA chapter.

He opened his presentation with an idea that has since stuck in my mind. How do you decide if you should take on a new project? He had a very simple method.

To take on a new project, it must meet at least two of the following criteria:

Outrageous fees.
Compelling work.
Fun people.

That simple. Now let’s look at the logic.

You cannot have just one. No one is going to give you a bucket full of money and not expect something in return, like maybe doing a little work for them. Nor are there projects lying around on the ground just waiting for someone to bring them to life. And “fun people” are, well, generally called “friends”. So, at a minimum you have to have two.

The fees are straight-forward. If you’re not going to get paid, why bother. Wait a second … if the work is really interesting, there’s a chance to learn or grow, or the finished piece will look great in your book, maybe you’ll want to take the project on. And it the client is a fun and lively group that you’ll want to hang out with after the project wraps … alright, let’s do this! See, his method works.

Another angle: The project is super interesting, a real challenge that will stretch you, but the client is going to be equally challenging. Charge them out the wah-zoo. It’s amazing how a hefty check in your bank account can ease the pain of the 75th round of revisions at 3 o’clock in the morning.

On the flip side, the work isn’t all that interesting but you really like the client, use this as an opportunity to make a little money. There’s nothing wrong with that.

Of course, the Holy Grail is a project meeting all three criteria. In my career, I’ve been fortunate to have had a few such projects. They’re golden: the opportunity to do some amazing work that I am especially proud of, while making some new friends and money along the way.

Mr. Williams is right; a project must meet two points, but in my mind, strive for meeting all three.


Seen & Noted

How Design Thinking and Employee Experience go hand in hand
Create an environment in which people want to work

Is political correctness to blame for the dearth of great advertising?

Avoiding the Standardization of Imagination

Why the Creative Digital Consultancy Is the Ad Agency of the Future
A new model for a new age

Why You Need to Design Your Design Culture

Marketing And Modesty from the Ad Contarian

Aaron Dignan: Being a Leader Means Giving Up Control
The author and entrepreneur says too many companies are clinging to Stone Age ideas about what it means to lead.

Pretend That You’re An Advisor to In-House Departments by David C. Baker

First Hand — Designer Matt Gardner on overcoming the pressure to be a ‘creative’ creative

How Brands Exploit the Aesthetic of Relevancy
Social media, design, and the meme machine that capitalizes on “wokeness”


Two New Identities

A couple of new additions to the Identity oeuvre. Melissa Ratcliff Designs paints exquisite watercolors and makes fine art prints. Her business is taking off so she decided she needed a logo to start building her brand. How could I turn my wife down?

The other logo will break this month for Sysco Foods. The company is celebrating its 50th Anniversary and the committee asked for a logo to commemorate the event. This was a tough assignment. How do you NOT infringe on the existing graphic standards, nod to past achievements but keep your gaze firmly pointed to the future.


There are Only Two Kinds of Design

I discovered a podcast called My Favorite Album that is about music critics, or other smarty pants-types in the industry, talking about albums that had a huge impact on their lives — the records they go back to time and time again. Being a self-proclaimed music snob, I’ve been choosey about which episodes I’ll listen to, but the other day I listened to the episode of Scott Sharrard discussing Miles Davis’ Kind of Blue.

Sharrard played in the Allman Brothers Band, and in his view, Kind of Blue had huge influence on the direction Gregg and Duane took the group.  What?

How do you get that? This southern jam band’s biggest influence is the modal, cool qualities of one of the most signifiant jazz recordings of all time? How is that possible?

Sharrard went on to explain how this cosmic duality is possible with an amazing quote from Duke Ellington. As Duke elegantly put it… There are only two kinds of music — good and bad. Let that soak in for a minute.

When I heard Sharrard relay the quote, a revelation hit me almost immediately. There are only two kinds of Design, good and bad. What’s the difference a print ad, a package, a sign system, an app, a website or anything else that a designer would make? The only differences are the tools used or skills needed to execute the design, but the underlying concepts and principles of greta design are fundamentally identical. For all you specialists out there, let that soak in.

I’ve spoken about this elsewhere in the site, extolled the virtues and praised the benefits of being a generalist. Looks like I have Duke Ellington to back me up on this one.


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